HomeEmmerdaleEmmerdale star reveals long-term consequences of Marlon's stroke storyline

Emmerdale star reveals long-term consequences of Marlon’s stroke storyline

Mark Charnock, who plays Marlon Dingle, has spoken out about his character’s stroke storyline.

The Woolpack chef’s life is on the line when he has a shocking health scare in Emmerdale scenes airing next week, with the ITV soap aiming to raise awareness by supporting the Stroke Association.

Prior to this, Dales veteran Charnock spoke with Digital Spy and other outlets about the implications for Marlon.

“I believe it will forever alter the character’s trajectory.” I’m not concerned about it because it’s just another chapter in his story. When you turn the page on a script, it’s another day in the life of your character, unlike any other form of drama. These things happen to people, and it happened to him, just as it could have happened to anyone else.

“From my perspective, it adds something to him rather than detracting from him.” It will alter him, but not in a negative way; I believe it will give him more facets and material to work with as a character,” he said.

“It’s all down his right side – his arm, his leg, and his mouth are all quite badly affected,” Charnock continued about the physical effects of the stroke. He has aphasia, which affects his speech and ability to express himself properly, so he can’t get to words in the first few episodes.

“He has a habit of making grammatical errors. He often sees what he wants to say but is unable to say it. He either uses the wrong word or is unable to say it, so he has a lot to deal with when it comes to communicating with others.

“He’s in a wheelchair to begin with, so it’s like climbing a mountain.” Because Marlon is such a talkative character and a physically expressive person, it’s a matter of reducing him to his eyes, which is how he expresses himself in the first few days and weeks.”

Further on, the 53-year-old admitted that, while Marlon’s recovery will take “a long time,” the “gloom and depression” will be offset by some “lovely scenes” opposite Paddy Dingle (played by Dominic Brunt).

“It has a lightness about it.” There’s also a lot of optimism – the belief that things will only get better from here. There’s also some good to come out of it.

“So, aside from being distressing and traumatic for the characters, hopefully, it will inspire them to reclaim their lives, and hopefully it will inspire people watching it to change their lifestyles a little bit in order to prevent this from happening to them because it happens to so many people.”

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Mark Charnock, who plays Marlon Dingle, has spoken out about his character’s stroke storyline.

The Woolpack chef’s life is on the line when he has a shocking health scare in Emmerdale scenes airing next week, with the ITV soap aiming to raise awareness by supporting the Stroke Association.

Prior to this, Dales veteran Charnock spoke with Digital Spy and other outlets about the implications for Marlon.

“I believe it will forever alter the character’s trajectory.” I’m not concerned about it because it’s just another chapter in his story. When you turn the page on a script, it’s another day in the life of your character, unlike any other form of drama. These things happen to people, and it happened to him, just as it could have happened to anyone else.

“From my perspective, it adds something to him rather than detracting from him.” It will alter him, but not in a negative way; I believe it will give him more facets and material to work with as a character,” he said.

“It’s all down his right side – his arm, his leg, and his mouth are all quite badly affected,” Charnock continued about the physical effects of the stroke. He has aphasia, which affects his speech and ability to express himself properly, so he can’t get to words in the first few episodes.

“He has a habit of making grammatical errors. He often sees what he wants to say but is unable to say it. He either uses the wrong word or is unable to say it, so he has a lot to deal with when it comes to communicating with others.

“He’s in a wheelchair to begin with, so it’s like climbing a mountain.” Because Marlon is such a talkative character and a physically expressive person, it’s a matter of reducing him to his eyes, which is how he expresses himself in the first few days and weeks.”

Further on, the 53-year-old admitted that, while Marlon’s recovery will take “a long time,” the “gloom and depression” will be offset by some “lovely scenes” opposite Paddy Dingle (played by Dominic Brunt).

“It has a lightness about it.” There’s also a lot of optimism – the belief that things will only get better from here. There’s also some good to come out of it.

“So, aside from being distressing and traumatic for the characters, hopefully, it will inspire them to reclaim their lives, and hopefully it will inspire people watching it to change their lifestyles a little bit in order to prevent this from happening to them because it happens to so many people.”

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Must Read

Mark Charnock, who plays Marlon Dingle, has spoken out about his character’s stroke storyline.

The Woolpack chef’s life is on the line when he has a shocking health scare in Emmerdale scenes airing next week, with the ITV soap aiming to raise awareness by supporting the Stroke Association.

Prior to this, Dales veteran Charnock spoke with Digital Spy and other outlets about the implications for Marlon.

“I believe it will forever alter the character’s trajectory.” I’m not concerned about it because it’s just another chapter in his story. When you turn the page on a script, it’s another day in the life of your character, unlike any other form of drama. These things happen to people, and it happened to him, just as it could have happened to anyone else.

“From my perspective, it adds something to him rather than detracting from him.” It will alter him, but not in a negative way; I believe it will give him more facets and material to work with as a character,” he said.

“It’s all down his right side – his arm, his leg, and his mouth are all quite badly affected,” Charnock continued about the physical effects of the stroke. He has aphasia, which affects his speech and ability to express himself properly, so he can’t get to words in the first few episodes.

“He has a habit of making grammatical errors. He often sees what he wants to say but is unable to say it. He either uses the wrong word or is unable to say it, so he has a lot to deal with when it comes to communicating with others.

“He’s in a wheelchair to begin with, so it’s like climbing a mountain.” Because Marlon is such a talkative character and a physically expressive person, it’s a matter of reducing him to his eyes, which is how he expresses himself in the first few days and weeks.”

Further on, the 53-year-old admitted that, while Marlon’s recovery will take “a long time,” the “gloom and depression” will be offset by some “lovely scenes” opposite Paddy Dingle (played by Dominic Brunt).

“It has a lightness about it.” There’s also a lot of optimism – the belief that things will only get better from here. There’s also some good to come out of it.

“So, aside from being distressing and traumatic for the characters, hopefully, it will inspire them to reclaim their lives, and hopefully it will inspire people watching it to change their lifestyles a little bit in order to prevent this from happening to them because it happens to so many people.”

LEAVE A REPLY

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Please enter your name here

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