HomeSPOILERSJamie Brothwick: 'I will never ever be OK'- EastEnders star reveals 'really...

Jamie Brothwick: ‘I will never ever be OK’- EastEnders star reveals ‘really bad’ condition

JAMIE BROTHWICK is an English actor best known for his role in EastEnders as Jay Brown. Since her debut in the soap in 2006, the actress has been a part of some of the most dramatic storylines in the industry. Off-screen, however, Jamie has faced his own set of challenges, including overcoming a phobia that prevents him from leaving his house.

The 27-year-old actor recently opened up about his crippling fear of getting sick on the podcast Lads, Dads, and a Couple of Beers. An overwhelming and debilitating fear of an object, place, situation, feeling, or animal, according to the NHS. Phobias are often triggered by a person’s exaggerated or unrealistic sense of danger about a situation or object, and they can become so severe that they cause the person a great deal of anxiety and limit their daily lives, as Jamie’s has.

“I’ve never really talked about it, but I have a real fear of getting sick, called emetophobia,” she says “He went into great detail.

“I’m in a lot of pain because of it, and it’s affecting me in a lot of ways.” I didn’t want to go out, and I certainly didn’t want to shake anyone’s hand.

“It became a thing about germs, and I became a little OCD about it.”

I didn’t want to be around a lot of people in a crowded environment.

“It just made me feel really anxious.”

The actor went on to say that his overwhelming fears had turned into anxiety attacks, which had “kept him from living his life.”

Despite seeking help and attempting to overcome his fears, the actor stated that he will never be able to “let go” completely.

“I’ll never be OK about being sick ever,” Jamie continued, “but I just get to a point where I cope with it and deal with it the best I can.”

“Now I see what you’re getting at. I’ve got a toolbox full of tools to manage it, and I’m aware that there will be times when I’m not in the environment I want to be all of the time.

“I suppose I learned to deal with it the best I could at the time, which was about five or six years ago.

“I was just being selfish, and I wouldn’t put myself in a situation where I felt threatened.”

A phobia is a type of anxiety disorder, according to the NHS, but individuals may not experience symptoms until they come into contact with the phobia’s source.

Even thinking about the source of a phobia can cause anxiety or panic in some people, a condition known as anticipatory anxiety.

Although phobias affect people differently, the following are the most common symptoms that people who come into contact with their phobias experience:

  • Unsteadiness, dizziness and lightheadedness
  • Nausea
  • Sweating
  • Increased heart rate or palpitations
  • Shortness of breath
  • Trembling or shaking
  • An upset stomach.

Specific or simple phobias and complex phobias are the two types of phobias. The former are usually developed during childhood and revolve around a specific object, situation, or activity. The latter is more incapacitating and is linked to a deep-seated fear or anxiety about a specific situation or circumstance.

Simple phobias include the following:

  • Animal phobias – such as dogs, spiders, snakes or rodents
  • Environmental phobias – such as heights, deep water and germs
  • Situational phobias – such as visiting the dentist or flying
  • Bodily phobias – such as blood, vomit or having injections
  • Sexual phobias – such as performance anxiety or the fear of getting a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

While agoraphobia – a fear of being in situations where escape is difficult – and social phobia – an overwhelming fear of social situations – are the most common complex phobias.

Individuals may not always get a phobia formally diagnosed due to the nature of the phobia. A person may choose to live with a phobia by carefully avoiding the object or situation that they are afraid of.

However, for those whose lives are becoming increasingly difficult as a result of the phobia, professional help from a behavioural therapist may be required to help them cope.

Phobias can usually be treated and cured. Simple phobias can be treated by gradually exposing yourself to the trigger object, animal, place, or situation. Treatment for complex phobias may include counseling, psychotherapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to help you change your thoughts and behaviors.

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JAMIE BROTHWICK is an English actor best known for his role in EastEnders as Jay Brown. Since her debut in the soap in 2006, the actress has been a part of some of the most dramatic storylines in the industry. Off-screen, however, Jamie has faced his own set of challenges, including overcoming a phobia that prevents him from leaving his house.

The 27-year-old actor recently opened up about his crippling fear of getting sick on the podcast Lads, Dads, and a Couple of Beers. An overwhelming and debilitating fear of an object, place, situation, feeling, or animal, according to the NHS. Phobias are often triggered by a person’s exaggerated or unrealistic sense of danger about a situation or object, and they can become so severe that they cause the person a great deal of anxiety and limit their daily lives, as Jamie’s has.

“I’ve never really talked about it, but I have a real fear of getting sick, called emetophobia,” she says “He went into great detail.

“I’m in a lot of pain because of it, and it’s affecting me in a lot of ways.” I didn’t want to go out, and I certainly didn’t want to shake anyone’s hand.

“It became a thing about germs, and I became a little OCD about it.”

I didn’t want to be around a lot of people in a crowded environment.

“It just made me feel really anxious.”

The actor went on to say that his overwhelming fears had turned into anxiety attacks, which had “kept him from living his life.”

Despite seeking help and attempting to overcome his fears, the actor stated that he will never be able to “let go” completely.

“I’ll never be OK about being sick ever,” Jamie continued, “but I just get to a point where I cope with it and deal with it the best I can.”

“Now I see what you’re getting at. I’ve got a toolbox full of tools to manage it, and I’m aware that there will be times when I’m not in the environment I want to be all of the time.

“I suppose I learned to deal with it the best I could at the time, which was about five or six years ago.

“I was just being selfish, and I wouldn’t put myself in a situation where I felt threatened.”

A phobia is a type of anxiety disorder, according to the NHS, but individuals may not experience symptoms until they come into contact with the phobia’s source.

Even thinking about the source of a phobia can cause anxiety or panic in some people, a condition known as anticipatory anxiety.

Although phobias affect people differently, the following are the most common symptoms that people who come into contact with their phobias experience:

  • Unsteadiness, dizziness and lightheadedness
  • Nausea
  • Sweating
  • Increased heart rate or palpitations
  • Shortness of breath
  • Trembling or shaking
  • An upset stomach.

Specific or simple phobias and complex phobias are the two types of phobias. The former are usually developed during childhood and revolve around a specific object, situation, or activity. The latter is more incapacitating and is linked to a deep-seated fear or anxiety about a specific situation or circumstance.

Simple phobias include the following:

  • Animal phobias – such as dogs, spiders, snakes or rodents
  • Environmental phobias – such as heights, deep water and germs
  • Situational phobias – such as visiting the dentist or flying
  • Bodily phobias – such as blood, vomit or having injections
  • Sexual phobias – such as performance anxiety or the fear of getting a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

While agoraphobia – a fear of being in situations where escape is difficult – and social phobia – an overwhelming fear of social situations – are the most common complex phobias.

Individuals may not always get a phobia formally diagnosed due to the nature of the phobia. A person may choose to live with a phobia by carefully avoiding the object or situation that they are afraid of.

However, for those whose lives are becoming increasingly difficult as a result of the phobia, professional help from a behavioural therapist may be required to help them cope.

Phobias can usually be treated and cured. Simple phobias can be treated by gradually exposing yourself to the trigger object, animal, place, or situation. Treatment for complex phobias may include counseling, psychotherapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to help you change your thoughts and behaviors.

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JAMIE BROTHWICK is an English actor best known for his role in EastEnders as Jay Brown. Since her debut in the soap in 2006, the actress has been a part of some of the most dramatic storylines in the industry. Off-screen, however, Jamie has faced his own set of challenges, including overcoming a phobia that prevents him from leaving his house.

The 27-year-old actor recently opened up about his crippling fear of getting sick on the podcast Lads, Dads, and a Couple of Beers. An overwhelming and debilitating fear of an object, place, situation, feeling, or animal, according to the NHS. Phobias are often triggered by a person’s exaggerated or unrealistic sense of danger about a situation or object, and they can become so severe that they cause the person a great deal of anxiety and limit their daily lives, as Jamie’s has.

“I’ve never really talked about it, but I have a real fear of getting sick, called emetophobia,” she says “He went into great detail.

“I’m in a lot of pain because of it, and it’s affecting me in a lot of ways.” I didn’t want to go out, and I certainly didn’t want to shake anyone’s hand.

“It became a thing about germs, and I became a little OCD about it.”

I didn’t want to be around a lot of people in a crowded environment.

“It just made me feel really anxious.”

The actor went on to say that his overwhelming fears had turned into anxiety attacks, which had “kept him from living his life.”

Despite seeking help and attempting to overcome his fears, the actor stated that he will never be able to “let go” completely.

“I’ll never be OK about being sick ever,” Jamie continued, “but I just get to a point where I cope with it and deal with it the best I can.”

“Now I see what you’re getting at. I’ve got a toolbox full of tools to manage it, and I’m aware that there will be times when I’m not in the environment I want to be all of the time.

“I suppose I learned to deal with it the best I could at the time, which was about five or six years ago.

“I was just being selfish, and I wouldn’t put myself in a situation where I felt threatened.”

A phobia is a type of anxiety disorder, according to the NHS, but individuals may not experience symptoms until they come into contact with the phobia’s source.

Even thinking about the source of a phobia can cause anxiety or panic in some people, a condition known as anticipatory anxiety.

Although phobias affect people differently, the following are the most common symptoms that people who come into contact with their phobias experience:

  • Unsteadiness, dizziness and lightheadedness
  • Nausea
  • Sweating
  • Increased heart rate or palpitations
  • Shortness of breath
  • Trembling or shaking
  • An upset stomach.

Specific or simple phobias and complex phobias are the two types of phobias. The former are usually developed during childhood and revolve around a specific object, situation, or activity. The latter is more incapacitating and is linked to a deep-seated fear or anxiety about a specific situation or circumstance.

Simple phobias include the following:

  • Animal phobias – such as dogs, spiders, snakes or rodents
  • Environmental phobias – such as heights, deep water and germs
  • Situational phobias – such as visiting the dentist or flying
  • Bodily phobias – such as blood, vomit or having injections
  • Sexual phobias – such as performance anxiety or the fear of getting a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

While agoraphobia – a fear of being in situations where escape is difficult – and social phobia – an overwhelming fear of social situations – are the most common complex phobias.

Individuals may not always get a phobia formally diagnosed due to the nature of the phobia. A person may choose to live with a phobia by carefully avoiding the object or situation that they are afraid of.

However, for those whose lives are becoming increasingly difficult as a result of the phobia, professional help from a behavioural therapist may be required to help them cope.

Phobias can usually be treated and cured. Simple phobias can be treated by gradually exposing yourself to the trigger object, animal, place, or situation. Treatment for complex phobias may include counseling, psychotherapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to help you change your thoughts and behaviors.

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